Jump to Japanese/日本語版へ

“Maido, ōkini!!” (“Thanks” in the western-Japan dialect)
Delivery guys shouted and left the kitchen from the back door. We opened the boxes to check if we have everything to prepare the dinner. Sweet potatoes, aubergines, and Shitake mushrooms are for Tempuras, and a bucket of sesame tofu, the famous delicacy of this mountain.

Mount Koya is located in Wakayama Prefecture in the middle-west of Japan’. There are over 50 temples covering over Koya town located on the mountain top. I was standing in the kitchen in one of the temples. It was the season of Sakura (cherry blossoms) and I came to help the kitchen. It was the town’s busiest time of a year.

Shukubo – Temple Lodging

Traditionally, the temples in the town had been used as lodges called Shukubo, to serve for monks and pilgrims from far away. Nowadays, they have been welcoming many tourists from all over Japan and overseas.
The guests can enjoy unique experiences, such as attending an early morning prayer, meditations, and teachings by monks. Also, Shojin-Ryori, the vegetarian meal eaten by monks while in training is the main attraction. Usually, a meal consists of Goma-Dofu/sesame tofu (pudding-like sesame curd), Vegetable Tempuras (Frites) along with rice and miso soup.

Working in the kitchen, I was fascinated by the beautiful preparations of the dishes.
But at the same time, I had a sense that something was different from what I expected.
“Is this just a fancy hotel…?” That’s what I felt.


“It is supposed to be something far from worldly.”, I murmured.
Mount Koya has been worshipped as a sanctuary since a great monk Kūkai has founded his school Shingonshu in 9th century.

I came here in search of clear air, and the silence away from the hustles of the world below. And actually, I expected to have some spiritual experiences.

However, working inside the temple, what I saw was something more mundane of the little cultural town, where the local people work for the traditional business called “Shukubo”.

The ordinary life of a monk

The life of the monks seems to have so much less discipline than I imagined. Many of them have one-year intensive training in the mountain. And after that, they can eat meat, drink alcohol, work in the commercial industry or start a business, get married, and have kids. One day, I talked with one monk and he explained about this in such a relaxed way.

Image for post

“There is nothing wrong with a monk’s marriage. Because marriage and family problems are common for many people. And as a person to help them from these sufferings, I cannot give advice if I don’t know anything about having a family

Of course, his comment would not represent all the monks. But, I was impressed by how he finds his way of self-practice in ordinary life.

The three cheerful women

You might think that temples are operated only by monks. But, they are greatly supported by the local women. They work for the neighbouring temple as it is understaffed. There were three ladies aged around 50s to 60s in the temple I worked. Working with them was so impressive, as they purely enjoy working for the guests, although no guests would know that they are the ones who prepare the delicious meals.

Image for post

They run across the large temple buildings, vacuum and wipe the tatami mats in guest rooms, and come back to the kitchen to prepare dinner.
”Take a rest! You’re hard-working!” sometimes they shout to each other to encourage. Their hands were small and chapped, but firm.
Their cooking was loving and hearty. One day, one of the women picked a bunch of fresh mint from her garden to serve it on fruit bowls for the guests.
“I thought it would be prettier with a bit of mint. The customer would be happy.” She smiled.

After they prepared the dinner, they clean the kitchen and go home. When the guests arrive at the dining hall, it is the turn for the monks to serve the guests. We can rarely see the women. They are the great helper behind the scenes.

Through the work, I got to see the other side of this sanctuary mountain. It’s a mundane scene of Koya, where the monks, the families, and local people are working together, complaining about how busy it is, but still being willing to keep this cultural heritage. It’s certainly not what I expected at the beginning.

But, in a way, it reminded me that spirit is in something mundane.

Image for post

Shukubo lodging has been getting more popular, but they are concerned for scarcity of staffs as the number of young people to help the lodging are decreasing. It’s been a thriving business, but maybe too commercial and hectic. I sometimes worry about the women wondering if it’s too busy for them.

If you ever visit there, take a moment to feel the good intentions of the hard workers behind the beautiful sceneries.

「荘厳な高野山」をお寺の台所から見てみた

Back to English

「まいど、おおきに!」― 威勢の良い声をかけながら、食材の配達がひっきりなしにやってくる。配達されたものをチェックして、その日の夕食の準備に不足がないか確認する。天ぷら用のなす、ししとう、しいたけ、さつまいも。名物のごま豆腐はお得意先が作りたてをバケツに入れて持ってきてくれる。

和歌山県の高野山。山頂の高野町には、五十ほどの寺が点在している。その中の一つの寺の台所に、私は手伝いにやってきた。ちょうど桜が咲き、そのあとにすぐ石楠花が見ごろとなる頃だった。観光客がとりわけ多い時期であり、高野山は繁忙期を迎えていた。

お寺に泊まる=「宿坊」

高野町の寺の多くは宿坊施設になっている。「宿坊」とは、古くは遠方から来た僧侶や参拝者のため、寺に設けられた宿泊所であったが、近年は多くの観光客に利用されるようになっている。
宿泊客は早朝からお寺の本堂でのお経や法話を聞いたり、阿字観(瞑想)を体験できる。そして、僧侶たちが修行中に食べる「精進料理」を味わえるのも魅力の一つだ。精進料理の内容は宿泊施設によってさまざまだが、高野山の名物であるごま豆腐、野菜や山菜の天ぷら、豆腐や根菜を使った鍋や煮物などがよく出される。

画像1

台所を手伝いながら、精進料理のきれいな盛り付けと豪勢な内容に、心が躍った。しかし、最初に期待していたのと何かが違う、という感覚があった。
「ただのホテルと同じじゃないか…」 正直そう思った。

澄んだ空気と下界の喧騒からと無縁な静けさを求めて、そして、何か神秘的な体験を期待して私は高野山へ来た。しかし、お寺の中で働いてみて、私が目にしたのは、「宿坊」という伝統ある地域の事業を維持するため、慌ただしく働く地元の人々の姿だった。
つまり、私が思っていたより、高野山は「ふつう」の場所である、ということが、何か期待外れであったのだ。

画像2

僧侶たちだって、お寺に勤めているということを除けば、案外普通の人たちである。たとえば、彼らは毎日精進料理を食べているわけではない。肉を食べることも、お酒を飲むことも、結婚することも、子どもを持つことも、他の職業に就くこともできる。
夕飯時に、ある僧侶にこのことについて聞いてみたら、なんとも穏やかにこんな話をしてくれた。

「お寺に勤めていると、悩みを相談しに来はる方が沢山おられます。悩みのほとんどが家族のことです。相談を受ける身として、家族を持つことを何も知らなかったら、アドバイスもできないでしょう。」

もちろん、これは彼の独自の解釈だ。でも、私はこれに妙に納得した。出家した人だけでなく、世俗の人々も人生の苦しみから解脱できると説く「大乗仏教」の教えとは、こういうことなのかなと思った。

縁の下の力持ちの女性たち

お寺は僧侶たちだけで支えられているのではない。意外にも女性たちが活躍していた。彼女たちは主婦業の傍ら、人手が足りない宿坊を手伝いにやってくる。私が働いた寺には、五十代から六十代の女性が三人いた。
宿の部屋をきれいに維持しているのも、精進料理を作っていたのも彼女たちだった。女性たちは日中、広い寺の建物内を汗を流して駆け回り、料理の仕込み、部屋の畳の掃除と布団の用意、そして台所に戻り夕食の準備と、縦横無尽に仕事をこなしていく。実際にやってみると分かるが、かなり体力を使う仕事だ。そんな仕事をお互いに励ましあいながら元気にやっている。

画像4


彼女たちの料理は、厳密には修行の食事とは違うが、自然豊かな高野山の季節の移り変わりを取り入れた、美しくて愛のこもった料理だ。ある日、女性の一人が自分の家の庭から新鮮なミントの束を摘んで持ってきた。
“フルーツに添えたら、お客さんが喜ぶやろ。”と、 彼女は微笑んだ。

彼女たちは次の宿泊客が来る前の段取りをし、夕方には帰ってゆく。宿坊客の案内、料理の配膳などは、作務衣を着た僧侶たちが担当する。だから、宿坊客が彼女たちの仕事ぶりを見ることは滅多に無い。縁の下の力持ちなのである。

そうして、お寺の中で働く人々の姿を見ているうちに、荘厳で神秘的なイメージだった高野山の、もう一つの顔が見えてきた。最初に私が期待していたものとは、確かに違う。しかし、世俗的で平凡なものの中にも精神は宿っている。

画像5

高野山の宿坊は、近年人気が高まっている一方、人手不足に悩まされている。高野町には働き手となる若者が少ないし、若い僧が手伝いに来る数も減ってきているそうだ。
宿坊事業が栄えるのは町にとって良いことかもしれないが、すっかり商業的な観光地になってしまっては、宿坊で働く人達への負担が大きくなるのではと、私はつい彼女らのことを考えてしまう。

もし、あなたが高野山を訪れることがあったら、荘厳な風景の裏側に、ひたむきに働く人々の姿があることを少し思い浮かべてほしい。