Jump to Japanese/日本語版へ

Their unshakable confidence and the sharp look in the eyes derive,
I guess, partly from their food.

***

December morning in Rishikesh was colder than I expected. As the headwaters of the Ganges flow through the city, a clear, cold wind was blowing from the riverbank. I pulled the front of my jacket together as I crossed the Laxman Jhula Bridge, which was packed with the passers. Down a stair-stepped alleyway with guest houses and souvenir shops, I smelled l the delicious aroma of spices coming from a small shop at the corner.

A spice merchant from Rajasthan

Cooking Masala” is a small but well-stocked spice shop run by Mr Amit, who responds to his customers attentively with an ex-businessman manner.
The aroma on the street was from Masala Chai (spiced tea), which he prepared for tasting.
“It’s a very good spice blend with black cardamom.”
Amit said, as he poured the chai into a small paper cup for me.
The hot liquid, quite sweetened, was quickly absorbed into my empty stomach. The deep scent of cardamom stimulated inside of my nose. Ginger and pepper warmed my cold fingers and toes.

Amit told me that he is from Rajasthan, a desert area in western India, where spices are used a lot to prevent the food from spoiling in the hot climate. His family grows spices, but they could not sell well. So he quit his job to help his family and opened a spice shop here in Rishikesh, which is a popular destination for foreign visitors.
Besides, Amit runs Indian cooking classes, being a teacher himself.
“I want people to taste the quality of our spices, by using them in actual cooking. And, if you take my class just for one time, you will know almost everything in Indian home cooking.” He said.

The course fees were, for example, 2,500 rupees (about €30) for one including recipes of three kinds of curry.
I felt that this price was a little high, thinking that a meal in a restaurant costs only a few euros.
But the taste of the masala chai and Amit’s pride in his spices convinced me to take his lesson.

The magic red sauce

We put on a reversible apron with a fancy pattern, handmade by his wife, and Amit’s cooking class began.
“When you go to a restaurant in India, despite the variety on the menu, the dishes arrive very quickly. Do you know why?”
Amit asked us and explained.
“All Indian chefs have a magic red sauce that they use for every dish. They prepare the sauce in a big pot, and for each dish ordered, they cook it with the main ingredients. By doing so most of the dishes will be ready.”
The magic red sauce, as he calls it, is made with onions, garlic, ginger, tomatoes and a spice blend called ‘Garam Masala’, which is the basis of curry flavours.

Amit also told us there is a secret to get the most flavour out of the spices.
“The solid spices, such as cumin and coriander seeds, should be fried in oil, while the powdered ones should be cooked with water to prevent them from burning.”

To cook the red sauce, first you heat the cumin seeds and solid Garam masala in an oiled pan until they make nice aroma. Then, add the chopped onions and fry until browned. Add the smashed ginger and garlic, and tomatoes. Add a little water, add the spices and simmer.He emphasized that the tomatoes should be cooked well until all the water has evaporated.

When you see the oil separating from the water, that’s a sign that the sauce is ready.”
We cooked three kinds of curries by combining different ingredients with the sauce; Chana masala with chickpeas, Palak Paneer with spinach and cottage cheese, and Paneer Butter Masala with grained cashew nuts, sultanas and cottage cheese.We also made vegetable biryani, chapattis and after-meal chai.

The cooking class lasted a full five hours.He printed out all the recipes and neatly put them in an envelope and gave it to us. He also said that he would send us PDF files of the recipes that he couldn’t use in today’s lesson by email. After the lesson, he introduced a set of spices used in the course. Then, we were guided to a next room filled with clothing products managed by his wife.
That made me think he is indeed a businessman.

The restaurant full of Indian energy

There was a restaurant that was known well among travellers in Rishikesh. There was no name on the sign, but people called just it “Rajasthani restaurant”.

The restaurant was always crowded with locals, whether it was lunchtime or not. The floor was slippery with oil. We managed to sit squeezing into a spot next to a family with kids. But the plates of the previous customers were still on the table. There was only one waiter in this super-busy restaurant. The young waiter, however, was calm as if he keeps everything under control. He piled up the plates with one hand and handed us the menu with the other.

The Indian set meal, called Thali, arrived shortly after we ordered, and was much larger than we had expected.
There were a few different curries served in a small stainless steel bowl, and each of them was well spiced. Bowls of fresh vegetables and pieces of lemon and a sweet coconut milk porridge accompanied. Switching back and forth between the different flavours, we indulged into the meal. Even after I got quite full, I could not help wanting more after a short break.
I looked around and saw everyone was also eating like crazy. The restaurant is noisy, with the sounds of stainless steel dishes touching each other, waiters taking orders and children screaming. And yet everyone is enjoying their meal.

I stood up to soothe my stomach and looked into the kitchen, which is separated from the customer tables by a glass window. The kitchen was full of something like masculine energy. Young boys and middle-aged men with big bellies were joking each other and laughing. But as soon as the waiter shouted the order, they turned to a serious face and began to work so fast as if they were in one wheel.
I was convinced that this is where the powerful deliciousness of their meals come from.

Sometimes I wonder where the strength of Indian people comes from.
It may be the harsh climate and living conditions, the fierce competition of a large population.
And I think the magic of spices also plays a part in giving them the energy to overcome these challenges.

***

Thanks to:

Cooking Masala
http://www.cookingmasala.com/index.html

インドのスパイスの魔法

Back to English

インド人たちの、あの揺るぎない自信と眼光の鋭さは、
ある程度は彼らの食事から来ていると思うのだ

***

十二月のリシケシの朝は、思った以上に寒かった。ガンジス河の源流が南北を貫いて流れるこの街には、川岸から冷たく澄んだ風が吹いていた。

上着の前を引っ張り合わせながら、通行人のひしめき合うラクシュマンジュラ橋を渡った。
ゲストハウスや土産物屋が入り組む階段状の路地を降りていくと、曲がり角の小さな店からスパイスの良い香りがしてきた。

ラジャスタンから来たスパイス商人

「Cooking Masala」は、元ビジネスマンらしくスマートな接客のアミット氏の営む、小さいが品揃え豊富なスパイスの店だ。

良い香りの正体は、店内で試飲用に用意しているマサラ・チャイ(スパイス入り紅茶)だった。
「ブラックカルダモンを使った、とっておきのブレンドです。」そう言って、アミット氏は小さな紙コップにチャイを注いでくれた。しっかりと甘味のついた熱い液体が、空っぽだった胃袋にみるみる染み渡った。深みのあるカルダモンの香りに目が醒める。ショウガとコショウが、冷えていた手先足先をじわりと温めた。
 
アミット氏はインド西部の砂漠地帯、ラジャスタン州の出身だと言う。厳しい暑さで腐らないよう、この地方の料理はスパイスをふんだんに使う。彼の家族はスパイス栽培をしているが、あまり売れなかった。そこで彼は、家族を助けるため仕事を辞め、外国からの訪問者の多いここリシケシでスパイス屋を開いたのだ。 それだけではない。アミット氏自らが講師となって、インド料理を教えている。
「うちのスパイスの質を、実際に料理して味わってもらいたいのです。それに、私のレッスンを受ければ、インドの家庭料理の一通りのことが分かります。」
レッスン料は、3種類のカレーを作るコースが2500ルピー(約3500円)。
レストランの食事が数百円台で済んでしまうインドでこの値段は少々割高に感じた。
でも、マサラチャイの美味しさと、アミット氏の自分の売るスパイスへの誇りに心動かされた私は、彼の料理レッスンを受けることにした。

魔法のレッドソース

彼の妻が手作りしたという、派手な柄のリバーシブルのエプロンを各々身につけ、アミットの料理教室が始まった。

「インドのレスランに行くと、メニューの種類の多さにも関わらず、料理が出てくるのが速いでしょう?」
アミットが、その秘密を教えてくれた。
「インド料理のシェフは皆、どの料理にも使える魔法のレッドソースを用意してるんです。」
そのソースを沢山仕込んでおいて、注文が入った料理ごとにメインの具材を入れ、具材に合わせたスパイスで仕上げれば大抵どんな料理でもできてしまうという。彼が魔法のレッドソースと呼ぶそれは、玉ねぎ、にんにく、しょうが、トマト、そしてカレーの味の基礎となる「ガラムマサラ」というスパイスブレンドで作ったソースだ。

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is p_20181225_164835-edited.jpg


レッドソース作りに取り掛かる。まず、スパイスの風味を最大限に引き出すには、鉄則があるとアミットは言う。
「クミンやコリアンダーシードなど、固形のスパイスは油で炒め、粉末状のものは焦げないよう水分と一緒に煮るのです。」
油をしいた鍋に、まずクミンシードと固形のガラムマサラを入れ香りが出るまで熱する。みじん切りした玉ねぎを加え、茶色くなるまで炒める。すりつぶしたショウガとニンニク、トマトを加える。少しの水を加え、スパイス各種を入れて煮込む。
レッドソースのポイントは、トマトの水分が完全に飛ぶまで煮込むことだそうだ。
「油が分離するのが見えたら、ソースが完成したというサインです。」 

かくして魔法のレッドソースが出来上がり、そこに異なる具材を入れて、3種類のカレーができた。
ひよこ豆を入れた「チャナマサラ」、ほうれん草とカッテージチーズの「パラク・パニール」、そしてカシューナッツ、レーズン、カッテージチーズの入った「パニール・バターマサラ」だ。
その他に、野菜のビリヤニ、チャパティ、食後のチャイを作り、アミットの料理教室は実に五時間続いた。
彼は、全てのレシピを印刷してきちんと封筒に入れてくれた。今日のレッスンでは扱えなかったレシピも、メールでPDFファイルを送ってくれると言う。

レッスンが終わった後、すかさずコースで使ったスパイスのセットを勧めてきたり、隣の部屋に案内し妻の扱うアパレル商品を見せてくれたところは、さすがビジネスマンだと思った。

魅惑の定食屋

もう一つ、リシケシを訪れた旅人の間で評判の高い店があった。
看板に店名は無く、人々は「ラジャスタニ・レストラン」と呼んでいた。

ラジャスタニ・レストランは、昼食時かどうかに関わらず、常に地元客でごった返していた。
店内の床は油で滑り易くなっていた。家族連れで食事する客の間をかき分け何とか座る場所を見つけるも、テーブルには前の客の皿がまだ残っている。こんな混雑した中でウェイターは若い青年たった一人。
それでも彼は、全てを把握していると言った風な落ち着きで、片手で皿を積み上げて回収し、もう片方の手でメニューをこちらに渡してきた。

注文してから程なくしてやってきたインド式定食「タリ―」は、予想以上のボリュームだった。
小さなステンレス製のボウルに盛り付けられた3種類のカレーは、どれもしっかりとスパイスが利いている。口直しのレモンや生野菜、ココナツミルクの甘い粥も添えてある。ひとつのプレートの上で様々な味を行ったり来たりしながら、夢中になって食べ続けてしまう。お腹がいっぱい、と思っても、一息つくとまた食べたくなってしまう味だ。

周りを見渡しても、みんな夢中で食べている。ステンレス食器が触れ合う後、ウェイターが注文を取る声、子どものむずかる声で店内は騒がしい。それでもみんな、この食事をしっかり味わっている。
私はすっかり満たされたお腹をさすりながら席を立ち、ガラス窓で仕切られたキッチンの様子を覗いてみた。

キッチンの中は男たちの熱気に満ちている、といった感じだった。まだあどけない少年も、立派な腹の中年男性も冗談を交わし楽しそうにしていた。が、ウェイターがオーダーを叫ぶや否や、真剣な目つきになり一糸乱れぬ連携で動き出した。
この店の力強い味は、ここから来ているんだと納得した。

インド人の強さはどこから来るのだろう、と思う時がある。
きっと、厳しい気候と生活環境、人口の多さによる熾烈な競争の中で彼らが生きてきたからだろう。
そして、それらに打ち勝つためのエネルギーを掻き立てる、スパイスの魔法も一役買っているのだと思う。 

***

Thanks to:

Cooking Masala
http://www.cookingmasala.com/index.html