Life passed on

The Sun was hiding in the thick white.
We waited for her coffin in the parking lot,
all dressed in black and wearing masks.

The black car arrived from the hospital.
When the back door was opened,
there was a subtle smell of disinfection ethanol.

This is the last saying goodbye.
Grandma’s face had a little make-up
and was covered in a plastic film all over.

This is the final goodbye, grandma.
We bowed to her, and to the moment we managed.
People of the crematory carried the coffin inside to turn her body into ashes. We bowed to them too.

No more pains no more suffering.
At that moment, bright sunshine came out, really.

Her house was still, yet empty, smelling the same as it used to.
Auntie showed me tomatoes and cowpeas she grew in the front yard.

We ate takeaway curry dinner from the Nepali’s a few blocks away.
Grandma once liked it too.
Cousin’s son turned three already. And there were two more babies in the house. Uncle is “Jii-ji” and Auntie is “Baa-ba” to them.

The last day to enjoy summer’s hot sunny and humid.
“Oh, this skirt’s gotten too tight.”
“Shall we switch it with my pants, Mom?”
“Where is the prayer bead?”
“Can I borrow the pearl earrings grandma gave?”

Again, we were all dressed in black. The babies had bibs on.
Sunflowers were coming to an end on the road.

Grandma was waiting on the altar, given Dharma name.
Monk arrived and gave prayers in front of us.
Chanting. Prayer bead. Offering the incense. Bowing.
Glimpse at the late grandma’s picture. Bowing again.
The flowers, the last flowers. She loved flowers.
Then, babies started whining at the back.

As we walked back from the funeral,
Dad’s left shoe sole started to peel.
It made flopping sounds as he walked.
“Won’t you get it glued?”
“I will buy new shoes at the station.”
But as always, we don’t have enough time before the train.

In the car, my cousin drove us to the station,
I noticed the clouds rising into the summery shape in the blue.
Sky is always wider here in Gifu. Mountains sit far away.
“Nice,” I murmured. And “I left the umbrella.”, said my sister.
“Alright we can still make it.”, said cousin,
turning the car around dynamically.
I and Dad were squeezed into the corner of the back seats.

We were on the bullet train, finally.
From Nagoya to Shin-Yokohama.
Dad on the left opened a cup of Sake.
Mom on the right took a can of beer.
My older sister sat by the window, gazing out.
I read a novel I bought at the station.

As we arrived in Yokohama, Dad’s shoe sole completely fell off.
It was Friday evening rush hour.
We shut our mouths on the packed train holding baggage
filled with gifts from Auntie and funeral suits.

Quietly and quickly, we got back to regular days.

Life is passed on.
we will just live it.

***

火葬場の駐車場で、わたしたちは待った。
みんな黒服を着て、マスクをして。
太陽は厚く白い雲に覆われていた。

病院から黒い車が到着した。祖母の棺をのせて。
後部ドアが開いた時、かすかに消毒エタノールのにおいがした。

わかってはいたけど、これが本当のお別れなのね。
祖母の顔は死化粧がされ、プラスティックフィルムに包まれていた。
これで最後のお別れなのね。

祖母の棺を囲んで、わたしたちはお辞儀をした。
何とかみんなが集まったこの時に。
火葬場の人達が棺を中に運んだ。
ばあちゃんは灰になる。彼らにもお辞儀をした。

もう痛いことも、苦しいこともないね。
その時、晴れ間が差した。本当に。

もう誰も住んでいない祖母の家は、まだそのままの匂いがしていた。
伯母が庭先で育てたトマトやササゲを見せてくれた。
その夜は近所のネパールカレーのテイクアウトをみんなで食べた。
ばあちゃんも昔一度食べて、気に入っていた。

従姉の息子はもう3歳になっていた。さらに下に赤ちゃんがいて、
べつの従兄にも赤ちゃんがいた。
伯父さんはすっかり「じぃじ」で、伯母ちゃんはすっかり「ばぁば」だった。

次の朝は晴天だった。
「このスカート、ちょっときつ過ぎるわ」
「ママ、私のパンツと交換する?」

「数珠はどこ?」
「おばあちゃんからの真珠のイヤリング、借りて良い?」

わたしたちはまたみんな真っ黒に装った。赤ちゃんたちはよだれかけ。
夏の最後の蒸し暑さ。ひまわりの花も終わりごろの中。

家族だけの小さな斎場に、遺影と遺灰が据えられていた。
お坊さんが到着して、お経の時間。
詠唱。数珠を持って。お焼香。お辞儀して、
ばあちゃんの遺影をちらっと見て、そしてお辞儀した。
お花、最後のお花。花が好きな人だった。
と、子どもたちが後ろでむずかり出した。

かくして、ばあちゃんは仏様となった。
あらたな名前をもらって。

葬儀の帰り、歩いていたら、
父が「左の靴の底がはがれた」と言い出した。
ぺったん、ぺったんと音を立てて歩く。
「アロンアルファ、借りたら?」
「駅で新しい靴買うよ」
でも、大体いつも、そんな時間なんて無いのだ。

従姉が駅まで車で送ってくれた時、
私はようやく入道雲に気づいた。
岐阜の空は広い。遠くに山脈が見える。
「きれいだね」と誰にともなく呟いた。
すると姉が、「傘、忘れてきちゃった」と。
すかさず「今なら間に合う!」と車をUターンさせる従姉。
威勢のいいカーブ。
遠心力で後部座席の隅っこにギュッと詰められた私と父。

新幹線には間に合った。名古屋から新横浜へ。
左に座る父はワンカップを開け、
右隣りの母は缶ビール。姉は窓際で外を見ていた。
私は駅で買った小説を読んだ。

横浜に着く頃、父の靴底は完全に剥がれ落ちた。
金曜夜の、帰宅ラッシュだった。
わたしたちはだんまりと、お土産と喪服の入った荷物を抱えて
満員電車に乗って帰った。
静かに、そして早々と、日常に戻っていく。

命は廻る。
それを、営むだけだ。

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: